Frederick Binns  ‏(I606)‏
Given Names: Frederick
Surname: Binns

Gender: MaleMale
      

Birth: 8 March 1825 43 38 Sunderland
Death: 12 August 1911 ‏(Age 86)‏ West Ham, London
Notes

Note
Apprenticed to Edward Bromley, grocer of Barnsley, indenture cancelled by brother Henry following death of their father.1847 At S0238 about Ackworth School; "Gone were the days when childrencould return home fro m their stay at Ackworth and be reco gnized by their parents, or when, like Frederick Binns of Sunderland, who travelled to school by mail coach in 1838, a child could leave home at a tender age and never see either of his parents again."
At Ackworth 1834-39
Autobiography at S0060 mentions an Uncle Rowntree
1834 Mentioned in fathers Will
1846 Jan 13 Removed from Friends at Scarborough while shopman with H. Hopkins
Says he had jobs in Barnsley, South Shields, North Shields, Sunderland, Scarborough, York, Mansfield, Chesterfield, Belfast and Leicester.
1856 Directory of Durham; Frederick Binns, grocer, 18 High Street, Sunderland
Moved to London to go into the tea colouring business with R.A.W. ‏[son in law?]‏. The Govt put a stop to it by passing the Aduteration Bill. Then tried coffee roasting in partnership with a HUCKVALE, who was a salesman. One day Huckvale did not return and they discovered he had decamped with the profit on 5 tons of chicory bought with the firm's money.

Then worked at Idol Lane for Hughes Bros., and later for Ashby's for about twenty years. When R. A.W. left Ashby's he started for himself in Gt. Tower St.
1851 Census unmarried servant at 1071 Church Street, Mansfield, Notts. age 21, grocer's assistant. Married head was George Pickard, age 30, born Sandal Magna, Yorks , grocer master employing 5 men
1854 Aug 8 London Gazette: Partnership dissolved by mutual consent between Frederic Binns and Edward Binns, trading as F. and E. Binns, High Street, Sunderland, grocers and tea dealers
1861 Census married Head at Grocer's Shop, 19 Chester Street, Monkwearmouth, age 36, grocer employing 1 boy
1863 May 8 London Gazette; Partnership dissolved by mutual consent between William Huckvale and Frederic Binns, trading as Huckvale and Binns, coffee roasters of 12 Anchor Yard, Old Street.
1871 Census married head at 52 Camden Cottages, Bethnal Green, age 43, warehouseman in tea warehouse.
1880 Old Bailey ref t18800803-433 Trial of Henry Holland and Emanuel Solomon: Witness William Frederick Binns stated; I live at 451, Bethnal Green Road—I am in the service of Messrs. Samuels & Co., and have been for seven years, as a packer—lately I have been foreman—it was my duty to go to 7, East Smithfield in the morning to open the premises—I was also there last at night, and shut up the premises—I took away the key with me—Holland was also in Messrs. Samuels' employment before I went there, as a cleaner of shells—about 12 months ago Holland spoke to me about some shells—he said he knew where to sell some goods, and we could get a few shillings if I liked—the goods were to be taken early in the morning, and he would take them—I agreed to it—he had two cases of clams—that was the first transaction—the time of opening was 8 o'clock—Holland met me there and took the clams away—I took them from the ground floor—I got 1l. for them from Holland—the next transaction took place in about a month or six weeks—I made the acquaintance of Solomon about eight or ten months ago at Holland's place in Settle Street, Commercial Road, one evening after my work was done—there was a conversation about shells—I do not exactly recollect it—the goods were to come from Samuels'—I stayed about an hour—only Solomon, Holland, and myself were present—I do not think any money passed—Solomons wanted more shells—I sometimes got 30s. and sometimes 2l.—I used to see Solomon occasionally after that, sometimes at his house and sometimes at the Red Cross public-house, close to my employers', in the evenings—I did not go to his house very often, about once in, perhaps, two or threemonths—I went to see if he wanted anything—he used to tell us what he wanted; we used to agree on the price, and we used to send the goods round when the money was paid—Holland generally took them—I never did—Solomon only paid me on one Saturday afternoon when he came for the goods—Holland divided the money with me—I used to send him clams, spiders, white murix, rose murix, bull nose, melons, snails ‏(the snails were cleaned)‏, and merospikes, cleaned white ears, cleaned red ears, cleaned green ears, and cleaned black ears, also nautiluses and mitres—the shells in a case were sent in a truck—when they were cleaned they were carried round—they were not packed, but loose in a basket, according to what they wanted—I made no alteration in the case when it went away, I sent it out just as I took it from the stock—on one occasion some large snails went—I was paid 1s. each for those—my master sold them for 2s. or 2s. 6d.—I also remember some bulls' months going, also some bulls' mouths, clams, and spiders—that was about the beginning of May—on that occasion Mr. Marcus Samuels came into the warehouse and asked me a question—when Holland came back he asked him where he had been—Holland said for the sugar baskets—one Saturday afternoon after that I was on Tower Hill about 4.45. Holland was with me—we close at four on Saturdays—Tower Hill is seven or eight doors from my masters' place—we had just come out of the Red Cross public-house—we met Solomon coming towards Mr. Samuels' shop—he asked us if we would let him have some goods out, and we agreed—he said he wanted some clams, melons, and spiders—he said if we liked he would go and get the cart and get them away that afternoon—we agreed, and he went away to get the cart—when he had gone, Holland and I went back to the warehouse and got the things out—we had shut the warehouse, and we went and re-opened it—we got two cases of clams, a case of spiders, and a case of melons—we took the cases just as they were, without doing anything to them—the van came and backed up the gateway to the warehouse—Solomon was not there, but there was a carman driver—the cases were loaded on the van and taken away—that must have been from 5.15 to 5.45—after we had shut the warehouse up and got away, Solomon gave me 4l. 10s.—that was divided with Holland—the value of these stores are from 12l. to 15l.—one day in June I called on Solomon; he was not at home—I went in the evening and saw him—he told me he wanted some small white ears, some rose murex, and some turbos—he offered me 10s. for the six dozen turbos and 4s. a dozen for the rose murex—the turbos are worth 4s. a dozen, and the rose murex are worth from 15s. to 20s. a dozen if cleaned, but they were in the rough—the turbos were cleaned, and were worth 46s. a dozen—Solomon asked me if I knew anything about the row at the shop; some one had been selling shells under cost price. He knew it was not him, because he heard it was somebody that did not know the trade—I told him I did not know—I was spoken to by Mr. Samuels and a detective—I made a statement to them—I got instructions from them—Holland came next on the 23rd—I gave him six dozen rose murex, six dozen white ears, six dozen turbos, and 10 or 12 large red ears—they were put in a hamper—he took them away—that hamper was afterwards shewn me—I also saw some cases at the station like those taken. I had been in Messrs. Samuels' service six years when we started—the last basket of shells were sent with my master's knowledge—I have been told if I gave information I should not be prosecuted—I then charged my fellow servant—I did not think the more I said against him the better it would be for myself—I have received 15l. or 20l.—my wages are a guinea a week—sugar baskets are used in the trade, and it was Holland's duty to fetch them—I gave some shells to Solomon in February—I remember it because we had a carpenter at work in the shop, and it was a Saturday afternoon—two lots went in May—a young man in the shop went to Cannon Street to get come iron bars and while he was gone the goods were taken, and we fix the date by the bill, which was put on the file—it was the latter end of May that I saw Holland on Tower Hill—the cases are marked according to the different shells—I do not clean shells—Solomon did—he was also a porter—Messrs. Samuels used to import the cases—they do not sell original cases in London—they deal with customers in London and the country in all parts.I had no reason to complain of Messrs. Samuels, they treated me with every kindness and consideration—I robbed them on the first suggestion—I never told Solomon that Messrs. Samuels had a grudge against him—I do not know of any trade jealousy between them—I never heard of it—I will not swear it—when Holland said he had been for the sugar baskets, I knew it was a lie—I was then a confidential servant—we give invoices unless the quantity is small—I know Mrs. Crowning—we have not always given her invoices—she paid cash—we supplied Messrs. Drayson—anything above 10s. or 12s. they would have invoices for—I do not know whether I shall be kept in my situation—I have never asked—I am not going against Solomons for any benefit—I have not been told if he was convicted I should be retained—I hope to be—I heard my evidence read over at the police-court, not at Mr. Wontner's office—I did not ask to see what I had said—I first conversed with Solomon in a public-house close to his house—we did not go to his house—I have not received money and not accounted for it—there are no defalcations in my accounts—a large trade is done in shells—I do not know of many small houses—there are shell-bag manufacturers, and they are small houses—I know Mr. Antoine Jamrach by sight—I do not know that he imports thousands—it is next to impossible to identify shells except that a cleaner can tell his own shells—if he cleans for two masters he would keep them separate. Both Holland and Solomon were found guilty anr received sentences of 2 years imprisonment and 5 years penal servitude respectively. 1881 Census Solomon is in prison in Islington
1881 Census, married head at 451 Bethnal Green Road, age 56, warehouseman tea warehouse. No servants living in.
1891 Census married head at 31 Green Street, Bethnal Green, age 66, tea warehouseman
1901 Census at Walthamstow, age 76, retired grocer
1911 Census at 18 School Road, Manor Park, London E, widowed head age 86, retired grocer. Also present are; Hilda Binns, grandaughter age 8, born Walthamstow; and George Binns, grandson age 10, born Walthamstow. House had 6 rooms
Note at S0199 Roy W. Binns, grandson is researching origins; he is ggrandson. No probate found

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Family with Parents
Father
George Binns ‎(I7)‎
Birth 8 May 1781 40 35 Crawshawbooth
Death 19 February 1836 ‏(Age 54)‏ Sunderland
5 years
Mother
 
Margaret Watson ‎(I8)‎
Birth 31 July 1786 Staindrop

Marriage: 30 January 1805 -- Staindrop, Co Durham
11 months
#1
Sister
Eliza Binns ‎(I200)‎
Birth 21 December 1805 24 19
Death 4 January 1861 ‏(Age 55)‏
2 years
#2
Sister
Ann Binns ‎(I201)‎
Birth 21 March 1808 26 21
Death 7 July 1876 ‏(Age 68)‏ Croydon, Surrey
2 years
#3
Brother
Henry Binns ‎(I9)‎
Birth 19 January 1810 28 23
Death 17 January 1880 ‏(Age 69)‏ 62 Lansdowne Road, Croydon
2 years
#4
Brother
Thomas Watson Binns ‎(I202)‎
Birth 15 December 1811 30 25
Death 3 December 1812 ‏(Age 11 months)‏
2 years
#5
Sister
Rachel Binns ‎(I203)‎
Birth 5 January 1814 32 27
Death 12 May 1832 ‏(Age 18)‏ Sunderland, Co Durham
2 years
#6
Brother
George Binns ‎(I204)‎
Birth 6 December 1815 34 29 Sunderland, Co Durham
Death 5 April 1847 ‏(Age 31)‏ Port Nelson, New Zealand
13 months
#7
Brother
John Binns ‎(I205)‎
Birth 12 January 1817 35 30 Sunderland, Co Durham
Death 5 September 1875 ‏(Age 58)‏ Western Hill, Durham
3 years
#8
Brother
William Binns ‎(I854)‎
Birth 24 July 1819 38 32
Death 11 March 1866 ‏(Age 46)‏ Sunderland
17 months
#9
Brother
Watson Binns ‎(I855)‎
Birth 22 December 1820 39 34
Death 31 March 1905 ‏(Age 84)‏
16 months
#10
Sister
Margaret Binns ‎(I856)‎
Birth 8 April 1822 40 35
Death 30 September 1851 ‏(Age 29)‏
3 years
#11
Frederick Binns ‎(I606)‎
Birth 8 March 1825 43 38 Sunderland
Death 12 August 1911 ‏(Age 86)‏ West Ham, London
16 months
#12
Sister
Sarah Binns ‎(I857)‎
Birth 8 July 1826 45 39
Death 28 January 1894 ‏(Age 67)‏ Croydon, Surrey
17 months
#13
Brother
Edward Binns ‎(I858)‎
Birth 24 November 1827 46 41
Death 8 July 1902 ‏(Age 74)‏ Summerhill East, Sunderland
1 year
#14
Sister
Sophia Binns ‎(I859)‎
Birth 13 November 1828 47 42
Death 23 May 1858 ‏(Age 29)‏ Sunderland
2 years
#15
Sister
Lucy Binns ‎(I630)‎
Birth 14 August 1830 49 44 Sunderland
Death 4 April 1908 ‏(Age 77)‏ Ackworth
Family with Lucy Ann Stephenson
Frederick Binns ‎(I606)‎
Birth 8 March 1825 43 38 Sunderland
Death 12 August 1911 ‏(Age 86)‏ West Ham, London
7 years
Wife
 
Lucy Ann Stephenson ‎(I607)‎
Birth 8 June 1832 Hawkin Drive, Durham
Death 2 September 1909 ‏(Age 77)‏

Marriage:   -- Scotland
#1
Daughter
Sarah Maria Binns ‎(I652)‎
Birth 4 August 1853 28 21 Sunderland
Death 1903 ‏(Age 49)‏ Whitechapel, London
2 years
#2
Daughter
Lucy Sophia Binns ‎(I614)‎
Birth 31 July 1855 30 23
Death 10 May 1925 ‏(Age 69)‏
17 months
#3
Daughter
Clara Binns ‎(I657)‎
Birth about 1857 31 24 Sunderland, Co Durham
Death 3 January 1941 ‏(Age 84)‏ Poplar, Middx.
2 years
#4
Daughter
Margaret Watson Binns ‎(I653)‎
Birth about 1859 33 26 Monkwearmouth, Durham
Death 1936 ‏(Age 77)‏ Hackney, London
2 years
#5
Son
Frederick Binns ‎(I654)‎
Birth 2 December 1860 35 28 19 Charles St., Monkwearmouth
Death 1941 ‏(Age 80)‏ Hackney, London
3 years
#6
Daughter
Ellen Binns ‎(I655)‎
Birth March 1864 38 31 St Luke, Middlesex
Death March 1864 St Luke, Middx
#7
Son
James Stephenson Binns ‎(I656)‎
Birth March 1864 38 31 St Luke, Middx
Death March 1864 St Luke, Middx
4 years
#8
Daughter
Emma Binns ‎(I658)‎
Birth about 1868 42 35 Bethnal Green, Middx
Death 18 June 1941 ‏(Age 73)‏ Horley, Surrey
3 years
#9
Son
George Albert Binns ‎(I608)‎
Birth about 1871 45 38 Bethnal Green, Middx